Shabbat
Teacher Title תקציר Course
Rav Moshe Taragin Defining the Melakha of Zorei’a In this shiur, we will explore the nature of the melakha of zorei'a. Is this melakha defined as placing a seed in the ground so that it will eventually take root, or is it defined as placing a seed in an environment in which it is in contract with nutrients? This question may have a number of halachic ramifications. Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Ein Bishul Achar Bishul: Re-Cooking on Shabbat Two gemarot in Massekhet Shabbat (39a and 145b) assert that once an item has been cooked prior to Shabbat, it can be re-cooked on Shabbat without violating the prohibition of bishul, based on the principle of “ein bishul achar bishul.” In this shiur, we will explore this exception and the manner in which this rule reflects the nature of the bishul prohibition. Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin The Prohibition of Bishul in Cases of Limited Change Is bishul prohibited because of the improvement it imparts, or is the process itself prohibited, independent of any improvement? In this shiur, we will explore potential test cases in which a cooking process has definitely occurred but typical improvement has not taken place. Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Different Types of Bishul In a previous shiur, we explored the nature of the melakha of bishul. Is it defined as the processing of food to improve it? Or should it be viewed as a more formal cooking process, independent of the improvement it imparts? Based on this distinction, we will address various forms of cooking and probe the degree to which they are integrated into the standard issur of bishul. Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Me’amer – The Melakha of Bundling In this shiur, we will discuss the definition of the melakha of me'amer. Is it defined simply as gathering together items that grew, or is some transformation necessary in order to violate the melakha? Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Cooking with Fire and with Heat The gemara in Shabbat describes several methods of cooking food with different levels of exposure to fire. These cases include cooking with derivatives of the fire (tolodot), cooking with natural heat (chama), and employing utensils that did not have direct exposure to the fire (kli sheni). In this shiur, we will explore the nature of these variations of bishul. Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Dash - part 1 The melakha of dash involves the separation of produce from the shells and sheaths within which they grow. In this shiur, we will explore the basic definition of this melakha. Is it essentially an act of separation, like borer, or is it defined as the act of revealing concealed items? We will discuss a number of ramifications of this question. Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Dash – Part 2 In this shiur, we continue our discussion of the melakha of dash and consider the stipulation that the subject of the melakha must be "gidulei karka," something that grows from the ground. This requirement may help us redefine the melakha as the last stage in the processing of produce for human consumption, and we will discuss a number of ramifications of this redefinition. Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin The Melakha of Kosheir The melakha of kosheir is loosely defined as fastening two items through use of a "tying material," such as a rope. In this shiur, we will assess the nature of the melakha. Does kosheir prohibit fastening, or does it prohibit the formation of a knot? Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Defining the Melakha of Borer: Separation or Waste Removal In this shiur, we will explore the definition of the melakha of borer. Is borer defined as the removal of "waste" from "food," or is it defined as an act of separation? We will discuss a number of practical ramifications of this question. Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Borer for Immediate Consumption The halakha permits an act of borer, separating edible produce from non-edible waste, if the food is intended for immediate consumption, at least under certain circumstances. In this shiur, we will analyze the variable of immediacy and why it permits a borer action that would otherwise be forbidden. Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Lifting From and Depositing Into An Area of 4x4 Amot Typically, hotza'ah is only violated if an item was removed from a wide base of 4x4 and deposited onto a similarly wide 4x4 base. In this shiur, we will address this discussion and the nature of the 4x4 requirement for hotza'ah, which may explain some of the exceptions to and consequences of this rule. Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Defining Prohibited Bishul (Cooking on Shabbat) - Part 1 In this shiur, we will begin to discuss the nature of the prohibition of bishul on Shabbat. Is the melakha defined as an act of applying heat to items, or is it defined as advancing food toward digestibility through heat processing? Must there be an act performed upon fire or heat in applying it to food in order to be considered a violation of this issur? We will discuss this question in the context of cooking in sunlight, cooking through iruy kli rishon, and cooking in a kli rishon she-husar mei-al gavei ha-esh and in a kli sheni. Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin The Melakha of Makeh Be-Patish (Completing a Manufacturing Process) In this shiur, we discuss the melakha of makeh be-patish. Is makeh be-patish defined as completing a manufacture process, or does it prohibit secondary activities that normally coincide with the conclusion of a process but are peripheral to its conclusion? Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Defining the Prohibition of Kotev – Writing (Part 1) The mishna lists writing (kotev) as one of the prohibited melakhot of Shabbat. On a basic level, we might assume that the melakha consists of forming letters with ink or other forms of inscription material. However, several indicators suggest that the melakha is defined as the communication through text. Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Defining the Prohibition of Kotev – The Act of Writing (Part 2) In this shiur, we will explore the mechanics of the act of writing and what type of activities are forbidden. We will focus on the examples of ketav al gabei ketav, writing through erasure, and writing with one's left hand, noting if the status of these acts reflects something about the nature of kotev itself. Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin The Prohibition of Amira Le-Nochri Instructing a Gentile to Perform Prohibited Melakhot A number of sources in the gemara refer to the prohibition of amira le-nochri, instructing a gentile to perform a melakha on Shabbat. Is this concept an extension of the idea of shelichut (agency), or is it rooted in a different principle? Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Defining the Melakha of Tzeida The melakha of tzeida appears to be different from other melakhot in that capturing an animal does not appear to cause any transformation in the object of the melakaha. In this shiur, we will discuss the possibility that the transformation lies in the newfound human access to the animal. We will note a number of nafka minot of viewing the melakha in this fashion. Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Makeh Be-Patish Infractions for Halakhic Status Changes In this shiur, we will study a number of sources regarding makeh be-patish in the context of a change in halakhic status. What do these sources indicate about the definition of makeh ba-patish? Do they prove that it is defined as an act that concludes a manufacturing process, or do they prove that it is defined as an act that is instrumental in providing the benefit of a process? Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin The Melakha of Boneh (Construction) The mishna (Shabbat 102b) describes the melakha of boneh (construction). Typically, this activity is associated with the actual construction of buildings. However, the gemarot cite several instances in which actual constructions are not produced. In this shiur, we will explore the nature of this melakha. Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin The Letters of Tefillin The gemara in Shabbat (62a) discusses the violation of carrying tefillin into a bathhouse. Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Neirot Shabbat Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Hatafat Dam Berit Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Sinning to Save Others From Sin Talmudic Methodology
Rav Moshe Taragin Preserving the Broader Interests of Shabbat Talmudic Methodology

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