Rav Gad Eldad
Teacher Title Abstract Course
Rav Gad Eldad Why was Adam prohibited from eating from the Tree of Knowledge? In this week's shiur, we will examine the compelling parallels between the prohibition to eat from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil in the Garden of Eden and the mitzva to eat from the manna in the Wilderness. What does this tell us about the nature of human knowledge and the purpose of creation? The connection between Creation and the Exodus holds a message for all generations. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad Why was Adam Prohibited from Eating from the Tree of Knowledge? In this week's shiur, we will examine the compelling parallels between the prohibition to eat from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil in the Garden of Eden and the mitzva to eat from the manna in the Wilderness. What does this tell us about the nature of human knowledge and the purpose of creation? The connection between Creation and the Exodus holds a message for all generations. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “And We Shall Make for Ourselves a Name” – Why Not? The story of the Tower of Bavel is one of the great mysteries of the Torah. What was so terrible about the construction of this tower that God was led to thwart the plans of its builders? In this shiur, we will focus on the attempt to "make ourselves a name" and why this goal was deemed unacceptable. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “Let there be no strife, I pray you, between me and you” – Avraham’s Separation from Lot Parashat Lekh Lekha describes Avraham's relationship with his nephew, Lot, who accompanies him to Canaan and later down to Egypt, only to separate from his uncle when given the opportunity. In this shiur, we will discuss this relationship and how it plays a role in the development of the story. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “And God Remembered Avraham, and He Sent Lot” – Behind the Scenes of the Rescue in Sedom Avraham's argument with God regarding the possibility of sparing Sedom is difficult to understand, as is the absence of the mention of Lot from the discussion. What was Avraham trying to accomplish, and did he succeed in the end? Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “And if a stranger sojourn with you in your land, you shall not do him wrong" The Purchase of Me'arat Ha-Machpela In Parashat Chayei Sarah, we read of the negotiations between Avraham and Efron regarding a burial plot for Sarah. Why does the Torah repeat that Avraham bought the plot, and why does Avraham insist on paying for the entire plot and field instead of accepting them as a present. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad "After the doings of the land of Egypt… you shall not do; and after the doings of the land of Canaan… you shall not do" – The Three Stories of the Matriarchs Taken to the King The Torah records three episodes in which one of the forefathers travels to a foreign country and his wife is taken or may be taken from him. In this shiur, we will compare these stories, with the goal of understanding the persona of Avimelekh in this week's parasha. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “The God of Abraham, and the God of Nachor, the God of their Father, Judge Between Us” The Hidden Struggle Between Yaakov and Lavan In this shiur, we will study the argument between Lavan and Yaakov presented in the parasha, focusing on the religious element of the disagreement between them. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “I Am God Almighty” – How God Introduces Himself In this shiur, we will study the various "introduction ceremonies" that God conducts with the patriarchs. These ceremonies emphasize the strong connection that God sought to create with them and the covenant that He made with them in giving them the land. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad "Your descendants shall be a stranger in a land that is not theirs" The Fulfillment of the Decree of Bondage in Egypt In this shiur, we will examine the story of the descent of Yosef to Egypt, focusing on how the events of his life reflect the parallel paths of man's free will and God's direction of world events. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad "You shall slay my two sons, if I bring him not to you" – Was Reuven a "foolish oldest son"? When the brothers return from Egypt, Reuven attempts to assuage his father's concerns about sending Binyamin by suggesting that his own two sons should be killed if Reuven failed to bring Binyamin back. What is the explanation for this peculiar suggestion? Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad "I am Yosef; Does my Father Yet Live?" Yosef Reveals His Identity Why does Yosef reveal his identity to his brothers when he does? Said differently, why didn't Yosef reveal his identity until this point? In this shiur, we will attempt to answer these questions through a comparison of two interactions between the brothers in which Yosef recounts his perspective on the events. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad Yaakov’s “Vision of the End of Days” In our parasha, we read about Yaakov's desire, before passing away, to reveal to his sons what awaits them at the end of days. What was his motive for this? Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “For the God of my father has been my aid and saved me from Pharaoh’s sword” One of the several similarities between Moshe and Yosef is that they both enable the salvation of Bnei Yisrael. But why does Moshe hesitate to accept his mission to such a degree? We will explore this question and how it may have affected the Torah's record of the explanations for the names of Moshe's sons. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “Why Do You Ask My Name?” The opening dialogue of our parasha includes God's detailed explanation of the different Names through which He reveals Himself. Why is this relevant to Moshe's complaint about his failure in the mission to redeem Bnei Yisrael? We will answer this question by studying an earlier interaction between God and Moshe on the topic of God's names. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “I Will Send All My Plagues” The introduction to the plague of locusts emphasizes that God has hardened Pharaoh's heart and that Hashem has a specific objective that He wishes to achieve through the plagues. Why does this introduction appear specifically at this juncture? And what is, indeed, the true goal of the makkot? Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “And with a strong hand he will drive them out of his land” In this shiur, we will consider the passivity of Bnei Yisrael in the process of their redemption. We will note that according to the original plan, Bnei Yisrael were supposed to be active participants, but because of their hesitation, Hashem completely took over the struggle - a point emphasized in His actions at the Yam Suf. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “Listen to me; I will give you counsel, and may God be with you” The account of Yitro's advice to Moshe appears to conclude with a "happy ending," indicating that Moshe successfully implemented his father-in-law's idea. However, study of the account of the appointment of the judges in Sefer Bamidbar indicates that Yitro's idea may not have been so successful after all. In this shiur, we will consider why that might be. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “For Judgment Belongs to God” In this shiur, we will note a particular anomaly in the phrasing of a number of the mishpatim in our parasha. We will also consider the appearance of the word elohim/Elokim and attempt to understand its significance. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “And You Shall Make a Menora of Pure Gold” Last week, we discussed discrepancies in the formulation of verses over the course of a textual unit with regard to the person or people being addressed, alluding to additional dimensions of understanding. In approaching this week’s parsha, we note a similar phenomenon, which sheds light on the unique role of the Kohanim in lighting the menora. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “That They Not Bear Iniquity and Die” The bigdei kehuna are introduced and explained in Parashat Tetzaveh, but the michnasayim and tzitz are presented separately. In this shiur, we will discuss why these two garments are set apart and what they have in common. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “What is man, that You should remember him, and a mortal, that You should count him?” In Parshat Ki Tisa, we learn of the command to donate a machatzit ha-shekel to the construction of the Mishkan, which accompanied a census of Bnei Yisrael. In this shiur, we will discuss the reason for this donation and why this census was necessary. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “Let Them Make Themselves a Sanctuary, That I Might Dwell in its Midst” – On the Repetition of the Discussion of the Mishkan One of the most conspicuous examples of repetition in the Torah is found in the section devoted to the Mishkan. Following the detailed list of commands in the Parashot of Teruma and Tetzave, instead of simply noting, “And the people did as Moshe had commanded,” we find all the details of the construction repeated over again. In this shiur, we will examine the sin of the golden calf, which is recorded in between the commands concerning the Mishkan and their fulfillment, and its results and ramifications, with a view to explaining this phenomenon. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “But Do Not Rebel Against the Lord” Parashat Shelach describes the sin of the spies. Why was this sin, in contrast to the other sins of the people in the desert, treated so harshly? In this shiur, we will study the background for the people's complaints in the desert in an attempt to understand what made the sin of the spies particularly egregious. Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading
Rav Gad Eldad “What Would an Astute Man Like Korach See in This Nonsense?” In this shiur, we will study the various groups that took part in Korach's rebellion against Moshe and Aharon. What were the aims of the disparate groups, and how did the test and punishment proposed by Moshe properly respond to the complaint? Parshat HaShavua - The Weekly Torah Reading

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